General

Terminology

 

Like any specialized discipline, the martial arts have terms and expressions that are important for communicating in our school, but are not known outside of the training context.

 

Much of our heritage comes from Japanese Arts so we use Japanese-based training and counting words.

The arts practiced at Pacific Coast Academy also carry Filipino and Hawaiian traditions and some of our terms derive from those cultures.

Some of the terms and pronunciations used by Pacific Coast may differ from those in use by other schools and arts - these differences are reflected here.

 

People places and things around Pacific Coast Academy

Dojo
(“doh-jo”)
A (martial arts) school / training hall
Shomen
(“sho-man”)
the front of a dojo
Shihan
(“she-han”)
Master teacher
Soke
(“so-kay”)
Inheritor and head of the art
Sensei
(“sen-say”)
Teacher, one who has gone before
Sempai
(“sam-pie”)
Senior
Kohai
(“ko-high”)
Junior
Kenshu
(“ken-shoe”)
Future teacher
Kyosei
(“keyo-say)
Instructor of sixth or seventh degree black belt rank.
Dan
(“dan”)
Level, Specifically black belt level
Yudansha
(“yoo-dan-sha”)
Holders of black belt rank, collectively
Kyu
(“kyoo”)
Non-black belt rank
Uke
(“oo-key”)
Training Partner who receives a technique
Tori
(“tor-ee”)
Training Partner who executes a technique
Gi
(“gee”)
Martial Arts Uniform
Obi
(“oh-bee”)
Belt or Sash
Kiai
(“key-eye”)
A shout for physical and psychological effect
Tonbo
(“ton-bo”)
Dragonfly, the “winning insect” in Samurai culture

 

Our Arts and Systems

Danzan ryu
(“dan-zan-roo”)
The name of the style of Ju Jitsu taught at Pacific Coast
Danzan
(“dan-zan”)
"Sandalwood Mountain,"
Ryu
(“roo”)
System or style
Ken Ju ryu
(“ken-joo-roo”)
The art developed by Professor Kufferath and Shihan Russ
Ju Jitsu
(“joo jit-soo”)
Loosely, "the gentle way."
Ju
(“joo”)
Soft, gentle, pliant
Jitsu
(“jit-su”)
Practice or art. (Also jutsu.)
Kenpo Ju Jitsu
(“ken-po-joo-jit-soo”)
A "blended" art of Kenpo and Ju Jitsu
Kenpo
(“ken-po”)
Literally the "way of the fist."
Ken
(“ken”)
Sword or fist
Shinkodenkai
(“Shin-co-denk-eye”)
"New old school," or, "Where the old meets the new."
Kai
(“k’eye”)
school or training community.
Eskrima
(“es-cream-ah”)
"to skirmish." refers to Filipino stick fighting systems.
Kodenkan
(“co-den-can”)
"School of ancient tradition."
Karate
(“car-art-ay”)
Literally, "open hand."
Ken jitsu
(“ken-jit-soo”)
A general term for a Japanese sword art.
Judo
(“joo-doh”)
A sport based on throws and holds.
Kendo
(“ken-doh”)
A sport using simulated sword strikes and protective padding.
Shinken
(“shin-ken”)
A Japanese sword.
Jiu Jitsu
(“joo jit-soo”)
A grappling sport, that shares no heritage with Danzan Ryu.

 

Terminology used in Teaching at Pacific Coast Academy

Dachi
(“dah-chee”)
Stance
Tachi
("tah-chee”)
Strike / Weapon
Geri
(“ger-ree”)
Kick
Uke
(“oo-key”
Block
Zuki
(“zoo-key”)
Punch or Thrust
Pinan
(“pin-yan”)
“Peace & Harmony” Exercise form
Yoi
(“yoy”)
Ready Position
Hiken
(“hee-ken”)
Covered Fist Position (Respect)
Ukemi
(“oo-ke-mee”)
The art of falling to avoid injury when falling.
Seiza
(“say-za”)
Kneeling position, hands on thighs
Anza
(“Ahn-za”)
Cross legged sitting position, hands on thighs
Migi
(“mee-gee”)
Right
Hidari
(“hi-dah-ree”)
Left
Mae
(“my”)
Front
Ushiro
(“oo-shi-row”
Back
Kata
(“kah-ta”
Movement Form
Yawara
(yah-wah-rah”)
Hand techniques
Nage
(“nah-gay”)
Throw / throwing techniques
Oku
(“oh-koo”)
Combination Arts
Shime
(“shi-may”)
Constricting arts  (chokes / strangles etc)
Shinyo
(“shin-yo”)
 
Shinen
(“shin-nen”)
 
Kake
(“ka-key”)
Execution of a technique
Keri
(“care-ee”)
A kick
Atemi
(“ah-te-me”)
vital points on the body vulnerable to striking,
Hazushi
(“ha-zoo-she”)
Escape
Katate
(“ka-ta-tay”)
Single hand
Ryote
(“rye-oh-tay”)
Double hand
Yubi
(“you-bee”)
Finger or fingers
Goshi
(“go-shee”)
Hip
Momo
(“moh-moh”)
Thigh
Hiza
(“he-za")
Knee
Ashi
(“ah-she”)
Leg or foot (sometimes ankle)
Morote
(“more-oh-tay”)
Two-handed
Harai
(“har-eye”)
Sweep
Gari
(“gar-ee”)
Reap
Gama
(“gah-ma”)
Sickle
Hane
(“han-nee”)
Springing
Tsukikomi
(“su-key-comb-ee”)
Thrusting
Garami
(“gar-ahm-ee”)
Joint lock
Gaeshi
(“ga-ae-shee”)
Overturn
Tomoe
(“tom-moi”)
Circle
Otoshi
(“oh-toe-shee”)
Downward (or drop)
Kuzushi
(“ka-zoo-shee”) (or ka-zoo-sh”)
Off-balancing an opponent
Tsukuri
(“sue-coo-ree”)
Fitting in
Gatame
(“gah-tom-ee”) or (“gah-ta-may”)
Hold down
Katsu
(“cot-sue”)
Resuscitation technique
Gyaku
(“gyah-coo”)
Reverse
Tanto
(“tan-toe”)
Type of knife / blade
Shuto
(“shoo-toe”)
Knife’s edge
Daito
(“die-toe”)
Sword
Tanju
(“tawn-joo”)
Gun
Bo
(“bo”)
Staff
Hanbo
(“hawn-bo”)
Half staff

 

Commands & Responses

Kiotsuke
(“k-yot-s’kay”)
Attention! Standing position feet together.
Rei
(“ray”)
Bow from standing position
Yoi
(“yoy”)
Ready
Hajime
(“ha-jih-may”)
Begin
Matte
(“mah-tay”)
Wait
Yame
(“ya-may”)
Stop
Yasume
 (“ya-zoo-may”)
Relax     
Hai
(“High”)
Yes
Osu
(“oss”)
General response for acknowledgement or greeting
Onegai Simasu
(“on-ee-gash-ee-mas”)
“May we interact?”
Domo arigato gozaimashita “Thank You”

 

Counting

Ichi
(eech)
One
Ni
(“nee”)
Two
San
(“san”)
Three
Chi
(“chee”)
Four
Go
(“go”)
Five
Roku
(“row”)
Six
Sichi
(“seech”)
Seven
Hachi
(“hatch”)
Eight
Ku
(“koo”)
Nine
Ju
(“joo”)
Ten
Ju Ichi
(“joo-eech”)
Eleven
Ju Ni
(“joo-nee”)
Twelve
Ju San
(“joo-san”)
Thirteen
Ju Chi
(“joo-chee”)
Fourteen
Ju Go
(“joo-go”)
Fiftteen
Ju Roku
(“joo-row”)
Sixteen
Ju Sichi
(“joo-seech”)
Seventeen
Ju Hachi
(“joo-hatch”)
Eighteen
Ju Ku
(“joo-koo”)
Nineteen
Ni Ju
(“nee-joo”)
Twenty
Ni Ju Ichi
(“nee-joo-eech”)
Twenty One
Ni Ju Ni
(“nee-joo-nee”)
Twenty Two
Ni Ju San
(“nee-joo-san”)
Twenty Three
Ni Ju Chi
(“nee--joo-chee”)
Twenty Four
Ni Ju Go
(“nee-joo-go”)
Twenty Five
Ni Ju Roku
(“nee-joo-row”)
Twenty Six
Ni Ju Sichi
(“nee-joo-seech”)
Twenty Seven
Ni Ju Hachi
(“nee-joo-hatch”)
Twenty Eight
Ni Ju Ku
(“nee-joo-koo”)
Twenty Nine
Etc
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The Dojo

 

The Pacific Coast Academy of Martial Arts dojo (or school) is a modern, state of the art training facility that is entirely unique and sets the standard for martial arts training in the 21st century.

 

The dojo, designed by Shihanke Rhodes, to meet his exacting standards, is a modern, clean, well lit and airconditioned facility with state of the art equipment and mats.

 

The entire training area has been designed to incoportate full length mirrors to ensure that students can easily view instruction from a number of angles and view their own technique and forms.

 

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It has a purpose built changing area where our students can change in privacy before and after classes and has a comfortable waiting area where clases can be easily viewed.

 

The dojo uniquely blends a modern training facility, while maintaining a thoroughly traditional martial arts training school envoironment that reflects the traditions and teachings its founders and teachers of our arts have passed down to Shihan Rhodes.

 

The dojo, or training hall, is however more than just the physical building where we train. It is the place where our journey begins.

For students, teachers, parents, and visitors, it is important to conduct yourself in a way that respects the dedication and commitment of the training process.

 

We have a few points that we expect students and visitors to note when they are in and around our dojo

  • Always clean up after yourself on the mat, in the changing rooms, and in the waiting area.
  • Please wear shoes in the parking lot; it's safer for our students and keeps our feet and mats clean.
  • Other than water bottles during workouts, no food or drink is allowed in the dojo.

 

We encourage parents to observe their children's classes and we ask you to contribute to the successful training envoironment by refraining from loud conversation while class is in session.

 

The dojo is the home for our community and it is important to promote an atmosphere of respect.

 

The Shomen

Shomen is a word that refers to the face or the front. In the dojo, it is traditional to place a symbol of respect at the front of the training area, the Shomen.

 

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In the case of Pacific Coast Academy, our shomen holds a pictures of the late Professor Henry Okazaki and the late Professor Sig Kufferath, who was Shihan's teacher and taught at Pacific Coast until the end of his life. Shihan Rhodes always credits Professor Kufferath as the source of his teachings.

 

Belt Tying

 

An important part of your uniform (or Gi as we call it in Martial Arts) is the belt (Obi) and knowing how to tie it and wear it correctly.

While knowing how to tie your belt properly before practicing martial arts may not seem like an important detail, it is actually one of the fundamental skills for beginning your training.

 

The belt, or obi, keeps your uniform tightly secured and it is important it is correctly tied.

 

Follow these steps to tie your obi correctly.

 

Start by holding the label end of the belt across your stomach, in front of you, about 1 or 2 inches below your navel.

The ends should be of equal length. It should hang a couple of inches longer than the length you want the belt to be when it is tied.

Pull the belt tightly around your waist, so that it is snug without restricting your movement or causing you discomfort.

Wrap the belt twice around your body, with the ends open at the front of your waist

Tuck the non-label end of the belt under both layers and pull it up.

Pull both ends to tighten the knot.

The label end of the belt should still be on your left side.

Fold down the non-label end of the belt.
Tuck the label end of the belt under the other end and over to your right side.
Loop the label end of the belt around the other end and through the knot.
Pull to tighten the knot. If the belts ends are not the same length, untie the knot and adjust the length.